The majority of the pictures and text are copied by kind permission of The Pulham Market Society from the published book - Pulham Market Past and Present. We are very grateful to all residents who have contributed and supplied the other photographs that fill us in on life in Pulham Market in years gone by...
Past and Present
Home
Parish Council
Heritage
Clubs
Amenities
Businesses
Gallery
Events
HERITAGE OF PULHAM MARKET
Main Navigation
Links
Contact
Parish Clerk
01379 608 590
Pulham Market Parish Council
Copyright 2012
Home
Parish Council
Amenities
Clubs
Businesses
Heritage
Events
Gallery
South Norfolk Council
Norfolk County Council
clerk@pulham-market.co.uk
Web by Copy Concept
'Knotty Kott' is again a residential dwelling, after many years of being derelict.

Left: John Vince, blacksmith and ironmonger, ran his business here from the 1860s-90s. Right: These premises later housed variously builders, grocers, hairdressers and electrical businesses before becoming solely a private dwelling.
Left: Post Office Corner.  The cottages on the left were demolished at about the time of the Falcon Road development.  The building on the right, formerly a chemist shop, housed the Post Office for some seventy years. Right: Following the move of the Post Office to the village shop, the building on the right briefly housed an antique shop and later a greengrocery, before being returned to a private dwelling. It is currently a hair salon.
Left: Falcon Road. The house with its massive gabled dormer was reputed to be one of the oldest in the village, dating back to the first Elizabeth or earlier, it was, together with the old cottages, swept away to make room for the Falcon Road development. Right: The Falcon Road car park and recycling centre now occupy the site of the old houses.
Left: The Village Green.  The traditional Pulham fair held in mid May has long become a thing of the past, but The Green is still used for fetes, carnivals and music days. Right: The Pulham Market Carnival, September 1999, the Procession of floats and vintage tractors makes its way around The Green.  The Memorial Hall, modernised and extended in 1984 and again in 1996, can be clearly seen
Left: East side of The Green.  The baker's horse grazes on what little grass is left on The Green, most of it worn away by children playing football and other games.The thatched cottages to the left of the picture were severely damaged by fire in 1958 and demolished.  A modern bungalow now stands upon the site. Right: The cottages on The Green have been substantially renovated.
Left: These picturesque cottages were pulled down in the 1950s and the site was later gifted to the church for use as a car park. Right: The old cart shed, which was used by the children for leaving their bicycles in when going to school, was demolished in 1949.  The present building is the Crown's reception and function room.
Left: West side of The Green.  The butcher's shop, run for almost 50 years by the Culham family, was closed in 1969.  Next to it, the blacksmiths, closed after the second world war, was demolished in the mid 50s together with the cottages behind. Right: A modern house occupies the site of the blacksmith's shop and the cottages, whilst the yard and building of the butcher's have become craft workshops.
Left: Harleston Road (Formerly Rectory Road) looking west.  Little has changed here when entering the village from Pulham St Mary.  The Old Rectory wall has been shortened and children still walk to school along the path as they have done for over a hundred years.  The milestone disappeared in 1940 when invasion was threatened. Right: Rectory Terrace today, the footpath on the right has been lost to the demands of heavy motor traffic.
Left: The blacksmith's grindstone stands next to the furniture and hardware shop; the main shop, traditionally divided between drapery and grocery, supplied most household needs. Right: Now, a modern self-service store, it also houses the sub Post Office.  The main building, its roof pitch lowered and dormers gone, still retains its old shop front.